Department of Mathematics Education


Jim Wilson

James W. Wilson

Jim Wilson became a faculty member in the Department of Mathematics Education in 1968 and gained tenure in 1971. His research interests include mathematics visualization, visual reasoning in mathematics, and development of understanding in mathematics. In particular, he continues to explore the role and impact of technology tools in mathematics for creating and manipulating external representations that lead students to refining and using visual images and visual reasoning.

Jim has served NCTM in several roles, including Editor of JRME for six years and elected member of the Board of Directors for 3 years. He received the NCTM Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001.

In recent years the courses he has shaped and taught include EMAT 6680 Technology in Secondary School Mathematics, EMAT 4690/6690 Technology Enhanced Instruction in Secondary School Mathematics, EMAT 4700/6700 Advanced Explorations with Technology in Mathematics Instruction, and EMT 6600 Mathematics Problem Solving. His experimentation with the many uses of technology is on-going. The Internet Web Page at Http:// contains many examples of these innovations. The Web Site has extended his impact to mathematics education beyond these classes. The site receives extensive contact from throughout the world, in the range of 30,000 "hits" per week and it is linked by over 300 sites around the world.

Jim Wilson is involved in funded projects and the search for outside funding. He is a PI for Project InterMath -- a 5-year NSF funded effort for improving mathematics background and of middle school mathematics teachers. He was a PI for the NSF Geometry and Measurement Project, is involved in the Contextual Teaching and Learning (CTL) project, PI of the Interactive Dictionary Project, involved in the Science Technology Center proposal development, and fund seeking activities. He had a leadership role in the development of the Learning and Performance Support Laboratory (LPSL) and continues as an affiliated faculty member. For the past 6 years he has been a co-PI of the CPTM (Center for Proficiency in Teaching Mathematics), a collaboration with the University of Michigan in the NSF Centers for Teaching and Learning and a willing worker in the Situations Project, a collaboration been UGa (from CPTM) and Penn State (from MAC)

There are 53 graduates of the doctoral graduates of the Department of Mathematics Education for whom Jim Wilson has served as major professor. The range of research activities for these doctoral students is quite diverse and underscores his continued involvement and interest in research activities. He maintains contact with all of his former students and encourages them with their efforts of scholarly productivity.